Great Plains Twilight

Geese under crescent moon

At the end of the day, peace and quiet beckon me home.

Crescent Drive

Twilight highlights the opportunity to reflect.

Great Plains twilight

The solitary Moon longs for stability, as do we.

Silver Moon

Restlessness rules those who refuse to accept the way the world turns.

Sundown bush

As a rule, no righteous endeavor is a waste of precious time.

Coming to terms begins and ends with me.

Uncle Tree

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15 thoughts on “Great Plains Twilight

  1. Oh! What a beautiful blue! Feeling envious of the moon as he’s floating along the sky, his empire, looking down at the clouds and the birds. Does he perceive us, I wonder?

  2. Thank you, angelbeam! 🙂
    The way the Moon influences the Earth and its inhabitants,
    one would imagine there has to be repercussions,
    whether for the better, or for worse, is anybody’s guess.

  3. I really like the photos and the words as they are soothing. The world is restless and I am, along with it sometimes. I wonder about the birds … they are Canada Geese, right? They are playing “Follow the Leader” but not in V-formation. I probably have said before that I marvel at the geese when they are flying in V-formation – I think I did say that when I sent the link about the guy who helps the various species of birds to get to their destinations. This is a restful and peaceful sunset. You have the perfect view Uncle Tree.

  4. Thank you, Linda! 🙂
    It’s nice to know, I can sound powerful at times, and soothing at others.
    From what I’ve seen, geese rarely fly in a perfect V-formation. Actually, they end up in so many different configurations, linguists believe their groupings and line-ups led the way to the variety of figures in the Greek alphabet.

    I do have a wide-open view — in more ways than one.
    My camera almost captures what my eyes do see. Magnificence!
    Time to step up my game, methinks. Peace, UT

  5. I think you do both Uncle Tree.

    You do have a bird’s-eye view of those geese over the golf course so you would know better than I as to single file. I guess I never saw them like that in a perfect row. I just pay attention to them when they are in their V-formation, coming in for a landing onto the grassy fields at the Park. There are occasionally pairs of them as well as they soar overhead.

    Can you tell from your vantage point when they have the goslings flying with them? I have only seen geese all around the same size when they are flying. At the Park where I walk, the DNR puts down some substance made of grape juice concentrate, once the goslings are able to fly. It deters all the geese from grazing on the grass which is in between the Figure 8 loops that people walk/job/bike on. They have baseball diamonds and soccer fields and playground equipment there too. The geese get angry and hiss and flap their wings – I have some pictures of them doing that. So, the grape juice concentrate is applied, the geese are gone for long periods of time in the Summer.

    I didn’t’ know that about the Greek alphabet – that is interesting.

    Cameras are one of the greatest inventions every made. My mom gave me her Baby Brownie when I was a young girl. She had used it for years and years and always took nice B&W pictures.

    I went to a butterfly walk last year. First time to go to such an event and I took a ton of pictures of the flowers, butterflies and they had a lot of unusual yard art. It was a woman whose entire back yard is loaded with perennials and she has a goldfish pond and a lot of milkweed to attract monarchs (it is an official monarch way station). It was a fundraiser for a local animal shelter and you paid your way by dog or cat kibble, paper towels or paper plates to be used at the shelter. Anyway, a woman next to me was taking pictures and I could hear her camera whirring away … we both were taking pictures of the same butterfly. She had a huge lens on that camera. I thought it was a regular 35mm camera, but it was a digital camera. I was amazed at the camera and the size of the lens. That is your next step up I guess.

  6. There are definitely goslings flying with their parents this time of year, Linda. I’m guessing, they must be a few months old. When there are a thousand geese trying to occupy the same airspace, things get weird, like they go around in a huge circle, and some then fly against traffic. I don’t know how they know who’s who after an affair like that.

    The’re still cleaning up the cornfields at this time, and only a few have ventured to land on the golf course. I figure the cold weather has delayed a lot of them, although, yesterday, we did have a couple V’s of Snow Geese flying way high overhead. And, simultaneously, I saw a murmuration of small birds, probably starlings. I tried to get some pics, but it was a sun-shiny day, and it’s difficult to see the screen. Plus, I usually don’t zoom in a moments notice, especially when they’re fairly low in the sky.

    As far as a new camera goes, spending over a grand on a toy sounds extravagant. It’s not like I’m turning pro anytime soon, so I’ll keep it to a wish for now.

  7. I like the ducklings and goslings and try to get a lot of pictures of them once they appear on the scene and at different stages of their life.

    As to the geese, I don’t know how they find their partners up in the sky when they do the turnarounds either … they all look alike to me! (But maybe that’s what they say about us humans too.) I have seen as many as five or six families during one morning’s walk. It amazes me how fast they grow from fuzzy little goslings to gangly-looking geese and then they are all legs. I’m going to send this link of my favorite photo of the goslings and their parents from last Father’s Day (I hope I haven’t sent it to you before … why does it seem I have, but I correspond with a blogger who writes of different birds in her native Tennessee and it may have been her I sent the link). https://lindaschaubblog.net/2017/06/18/proud-papa/

    I don’t think I’ve ever seen snow geese – sounds lovely. I get a kick out of seeing the mute swans. We don’t get a lot of them, but they look so beautiful and regal-looking gliding along in the water.

    I had no idea that those digital cameras with the larger lenses were so expensive. I have not priced them. I would not mind more zoom than 12X but this camera is in good shape so, like you, don’t want to get another one. I still have the original digital camera with the 4X zoom which I take with me when the weather looks dicey out, especially in Summer, but I always take plastic bags in my fanny pack to protect it from a sudden downpour. I like Canon and had a Canon 35mm and both digitals are Canon. The only thing with this camera is the point-and-shoot feature, so like you said above, you look in the window and you see your face, or your glasses, on a sunny day. If you want the picture then, like geese or a hawk flying overhead, you take your chances and shoot blindly. I’d be more inclined to go back to a camera with a viewfinder to eliminate that problem. This camera also has wireless transfer to the computer, but I never used that, I just transfer from the SIM card.

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